Gathering her classmates on the floor was a last-minute decision.

“It’s an intimate story,” she said, “So I figured getting everybody involved would make it a little more intimate.”

Depth through performance

Holcomb knows most of her class probably won’t go on to pursue performance art. Yet they can bring themselves into other types of art, like painting, drawing or graphic design, she told them after their presentations.

“But I do want you guys to consider what it adds to a piece when you do kind of put your body on the line, when you allow yourself to be vulnerable,” she said. “I mean, there’s something about standing in front of an audience performing with your own self that is truly, truly vulnerable, and I think it kind of added a lot of depth to your guys’ pieces.”

Findley combined various sides of himself in his project featuring his own traditions. He included his turntable scratchings because he’s involved in hip-hop music and featured skateboarding because it has always been part of his life, he told the class after his video. The colors of his coveralls remind him of home at his parent’s farm near Casper, and the mask represents his thoughts.

“They kind of go crazy in different ways, so it’s kind of like explosive,” he said, “but it’ll all come together.”



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