The birthplace of the Clydesdale is hoping to honour its relationship with the breed by erecting a “magnificent” horse sculpture.

The Lanark Community Development Trust is trying to raise funds for the project, which will celebrate the town’s long history with the heavy horse, which was first bred at a farm just across the river Clyde.

The sculpture will be placed near Lanark Auction Market which hosted Clydesdale horse sales for more than 140 years; although the horses were also sold at Lanark Fair from the mid-1700s.

The breed was developed from Flemish stallions, who were imported to Scotland and crossed with local mares, with the first known use of the name Clydesdale being recorded in 1826.

“The project will advance education by sparking local interest in the Clydesdale horse and Lanark’s agricultural heritage by providing a catalyst for the local community, local schools and visitors the chance to learn more about their heritage and the history of Lanark,” said trust chairman Sylvia Russell.

She added that this would be achieved through an “engaging schools programme, creation of an information leaflet and photographic exhibition” alongside the sculpture.

The trust is seeking financial contributions for the scheme, which is expected to cost £40,000.

“Any contribution or support, financial or otherwise, would be greatly appreciated to secure the success of this project,” Ms Russell added.

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The promotion of Lanark’s relationship with the Clydesdale is one of a number of community projects launched by the trust, which aim to “use the arts to promote and enhance Lanark’s heritage and tourism offering as well as boosting civic pride”.

These include the development of the William Wallace Trail, the Lanark welcome signs, creation of the William Wallace Close and most recently the creation of the Cameronian Memorial Sculpture at the former Winston Barracks.

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