It’s almost October, which means it’s time to revamp your look with new fall pieces—and two New Orleans sculpture gardens are doing just that. This month, the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden welcomed a new piece by contemporary Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone, and the Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition saw the installation of five new sculptures.

Titled “The Sun,” the gilded bronze sculpture by Rondinone comes on the tails of the sculpture garden’s six-acre expansion, which opened in May 2019.

“This towering, significant work by Ugo Rondinone takes its place within the garden landscape as yet another focal point for visitors to the garden,” said Susan Taylor, NOMA’s Montine McDaniel Freeman Director, in a statement.

Four or five miles away, the Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition also added five sculptures to its 35-piece collection. They are located between Convention Center Boulevard and South Galvez and range from eight to 17 feet tall. Artists Lynda Benglis, Earl Dismuke, Lonnie Holley, Phil Proctor, and Kennedy Yanko contributed pieces.

Presented by The Helis Foundation in 2013, the Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition is an ever-changing mix of art by local and international artists.

“Some of the sculptures are changed over time, allowing us to occasionally surprise the public with new pieces of public art,” said Jessie Haynes, Managing Director of The Helis Foundation, in a statement. “The latest sculptures on the Corridor are an interesting mix of critically acclaimed and world-renowned artists’ works with emerging and mid-career artists, which provides a platform for engaging with exciting new work while also recognizing New Orleans as a thriving center for contemporary art presentations.”

Both the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden and the Poydras Corridor Sculpture Exhibition are free and open to the public daily.


Courtesy of Pace Gallery, Benglis’ “Power Tower” is an eight-foot-tall, newly-fabricated sculpture in undulating form fabricated in bronze, with a high-gloss gold patina. 

Photography by Davin Lavikka, courtesy Lynda Benglis studio


“Dingbat” is an ode to storytelling and outlandish stories the artist recalls from his childhood in this steel 11-foot sculpture.

Courtesy Earl Dismuke


Previously sited on Atlanta’s Beltline, “The Guide” is fabricated entirely from steel I-beams and features an LED acrylic staff, being held by a towering contrapposto figure towering in at over 13 feet.

These are three new pieces coming to Poydras Street



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